Wild Goose Recipes

Dry Rub Goose Poppers

Goose season is just a few days away and we’re scouting our spots for opening day, so we can fill the freezer.  What happens then? Well, it’s still warm, so let’s light up the grill with one of our favorite goose recipes!

FYI:  This delicious goose recipe is from Tenderize the Wild: Marinades, brines and rubs for wild game.

https://www.riflesandrecipes.com/product/tenderize-the-wild-marinades-brines-rubs/

Dry Rub Goose Poppers

Serves 4

This is one of John’s favorite dishes.  He’s a lot more into unami, that 5th flavor, than I am.  Didn’t know there were only five flavors?  For the record, they are sweet, sour, salty, bitter and that last-to-be-named, unami.  The first four are pretty self-explanatory. Unami is Japanese for ‘savory,’ originally described as the taste of beef broth with seaweed.  For us Americans it’s red meat, mature cheese, mushrooms and the like. Savory–John’s favorite flavor—is rampant in this dry rub combo and meat itself.  For me, the Dijon/honey/balsamic vinegar spooned on at the end provides the sweet-sour-salty tanginess I crave. 

PS: If you already have a favorite goose breast recipe, don’t hesitate to use this one on thigh meat.  There’s a lot of meat on thighs and it’s as tender as breasts.

The Dry Rub Ingredients

24-48 hours ahead

  • Boned breast of one goose (A greater Canada would be about 1 pound)
  • 4 teaspoons mustard powder
  • 4 teaspoons Spanish paprika
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder

Preparation

Slice the goose breast into 1 to 1½ inch chunks.  Mix the dry rub together and rub it all over the meat.  Place the chunks in a re-sealable plastic bag and place in the refrigerator 24-48 hours. Don’t rinse off the rub.

The Rest of the Ingredients

  • ½ yellow onion
  • 6 ounces white mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon style mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

 

*If you’re using wooden skewers, soak them for 30 minutes before assembling the kabobs to keep them from burning up on the grill.

Cooking

  1. Preheat a propane grill to medium-hot, 350 to 400°F.   Alternately, start your coals. When they are covered with white ash–the vast majority of them, not just a few–spread them out for cooking.  When the cooking surface is hot, give it a good scraping with your grill brush, then wipe it with oil.  (Tongs and a folded up square of paper towel, with 2 tablespoons of oil will do the job safely, and if you do it every time, you’ll season your grill, just like you’d season cast iron, making it pretty much non-stick.  See photos on page 30.)
  2. While the grill heats up, cut the onion into chunks and the mushrooms in half.  Arrange the meat, mushrooms and onion alternately on the skewers, placing the skewers where the stem of the mushroom meets the cap, so it doesn’t fall apart.
  3. Stir the Dijon mustard, honey and balsamic vinegar in a small glass jar until most of the lumps are pretty small, then seal tightly and give it a good shake.  The mustard acts as an emulsifier and will blend the three ingredients into a smooth sauce very quickly. 
  4. Place the kabobs on the grill, cover it, and cook about 7 to 10 minutes total, turning once.  (Cooking time depends on how big—or small–those chunks are and how efficient your grill.  So keep the meat thermometer handy.)
  5. When you turn the kabobs the first time, spoon some of the honey/mustard sauce on the cooked side, then again just before you take the kabobs off the grill, spoon it on the second cooked side.  (Like barbecue sauce, the sugar will burn if you put it on the side of the meat that’s facing the fire.  You only put it on the side that’s already cooked.)
  6. They’re done when the thermometer registers 165-170°F. (Unlike red meat, birds are less dense, so the cook doesn’t have to allow for counter rise with birds. Cook them to the desired temperature, no extra math.) Serve hot with more sauce, if you’d like.  (To serve more sauce at the table, divide it in half before grilling, or make two recipes and keep them separate.)

 

We hope this becomes one of  your favorite goose recipes as it has for us as well. Check back often for more delicious wild game recipes and be sure the check out our other wild game cookbooks for amazing recipes only found in them.

Wild Goose Recipes: Dry Rub Goose Poppers

Goose season is just a few days away and we’re scouting our spots for opening day, so we can fill the freezer.  What happens then? Well, it’s still warm, so let’s light up the grill with one of our favorite goose recipes!

Type: main

Cuisine: American

Keywords: goose recipes, goose recipe, wild goose recipe, goose breast recipe

Recipe Yield: 4 servings

Recipe Ingredients:

Recipe Instructions:

Preparation:

  • Slice the goose breast into 1 to 1½ inch chunks. Mix the dry rub together and rub it all over the meat. Place the chunks in a re-sealable plastic bag and place in the refrigerator 24-48 hours. Don’t rinse off the rub.

Cooking:

  • *If you’re using wooden skewers, soak them for 30 minutes before assembling the kabobs to keep them from burning up on the grill. Cooking 1. Preheat a propane grill to medium-hot, 350 to 400°F. Alternately, start your coals. When they are covered with white ash--the vast majority of them, not just a few--spread them out for cooking. When the cooking surface is hot, give it a good scraping with your grill brush, then wipe it with oil. (Tongs and a folded up square of paper towel, with 2 tablespoons of oil will do the job safely, and if you do it every time, you’ll season your grill, just like you’d season cast iron, making it pretty much non-stick. See photos on page 30.) 2. While the grill heats up, cut the onion into chunks and the mushrooms in half. Arrange the meat, mushrooms and onion alternately on the skewers, placing the skewers where the stem of the mushroom meets the cap, so it doesn’t fall apart. 3. Stir the Dijon mustard, honey and balsamic vinegar in a small glass jar until most of the lumps are pretty small, then seal tightly and give it a good shake. The mustard acts as an emulsifier and will blend the three ingredients into a smooth sauce very quickly. 4. Place the kabobs on the grill, cover it, and cook about 7 to 10 minutes total, turning once. (Cooking time depends on how big—or small--those chunks are and how efficient your grill. So keep the meat thermometer handy.) 5. When you turn the kabobs the first time, spoon some of the honey/mustard sauce on the cooked side, then again just before you take the kabobs off the grill, spoon it on the second cooked side. (Like barbecue sauce, the sugar will burn if you put it on the side of the meat that’s facing the fire. You only put it on the side that’s already cooked.) 6. They’re done when the thermometer registers 165-170°F. (Unlike red meat, birds are less dense, so the cook doesn’t have to allow for counter rise with birds. Cook them to the desired temperature, no extra math.) Serve hot with more sauce, if you’d like. (To serve more sauce at the table, divide it in half before grilling, or make two recipes and keep them separate.)

Editor's Rating:
5
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