Our Report Card

Testimonials
Results 21 - 40 of 49

Slice of the Wild

This fine collection, the 8th cookbook by {Eileen Clarke} contains 140 recipes for deer, caribou, elk, moose and other big game, most of which {John and Eileen} shot themselves.  The author wields more than a spatula: she pulls triggers, too.  Besides the creative and tasty recipes, the book is chock full of excellent photos that explain how to custom-butcher your own animal. Eileen takes the mystery out of game care—from field dressing through cooling, aging, cutting, to cooking. She provides plenty of delectable side dishes to accompany the main fare. If you don’t own a big-game cookbook, this is the only one you’ll need. If you have one, you’ll like this one better.

Tom Huggler in www.woods-n-waternews.com


Tom Huggler

Obsessions of a Rifle Loony

Received my copy of "Obessions of a Rifle Loony" in the mail on Monday and have it just about finished. Great writing and there were several times I laughed out loud, scaring the dog. Great job, Mr. Barsness!


Rifle Loony reader

Obsessions of a Rifle Loony

Well, I've had my copy for a while now. I've read it about 4 times so far and and on reading #5. John, I have to this, you've outdone yourself. I have a fairly extensive library but offhand, I can't think of a book I've read so many times in such a short period of time. All I can say at this point s well done sir.


Paul B

Eileen in winter issue of Varmint Hunter, Rifle Bullets for the Hunter & Selecting And Ordering A Custom Hunting Rifle 

Hi, Eileen....You need to know just how much I enjoyed your article in my favorite magazine - VHA.  Most excellent!

And don't think you are alone in what you wrote.  I had to stay away from kickers for almost two years since I had a retinal separation underway.  Now that the separation is completed I have no worries about a torn retina, experienced by two of my pals.

'Course, we're all old...
 
I take my time with that magazine - allowing myself only an article or two per week, so that it does not seem so long between issues.  In fact, I have yet to finish the previous issue - both are by my chair in the man cave.
 
And I am also reading Bullets and just finished Custom Rifle...and cannot thank you enough for the autographs, especially your personalized one.  (Many decades...<G>).
 
All the best.
 


Rger C.

John;
Thank you ever so much for your reply.
The 1 in 4 rule! You know I've read it from you at least twice before and the specifics had slipped my mind this morning. Got it now though - thanks!
Thanks too for the trick of seating the bullets into the lands. That saved me a pile of work as I was going to open all the case mouths up to .338" and then neck it back down to .308" to create a 2nd shoulder. Seating into the lands sounds like a much more expedient way to get there.
I don't really think anyone is hoping to turn that rifle into a .300 Mag, they just want to shoot the newly inherited rifle with safe loads is all.
Thanks again and again, I hope you and Eileen have a good week.
Regards,
Dwayne

PS   If you don't mind, please pass along another thanks to Eileen for her fantastic cook book.
As I type, we've got a roast in the crock pot using the recipe on page 129 - "An even better sandwich roast".
At risk of being effusive, that book should almost be mandatory for new hunters because of the front section alone. I've lost count how many times I've recommended it to folks.
I'll bet you are the same, but if we had a dollar for every person who has said, "well I don't really like wild meat because it tastes so gamey"! - we'd be monetarily better off.
I suppose though, if they all knew how good it tasted, there might be too much competition?
Anyway, I can't say enough good about Eileen's book - it's the best I've run across by a wide margin.
All the best,
Dwayne


Dwayne
On Rifle Loony News
Hi Eileen, thanks for the heads up on Rifle Loony News!
I lost my hard drive around Christmas,(figures!), and wasn't sure how to get the connection back. Everything works great now.
I just finished "Grumpy Old Man."  My God, John sounds just like me, it must be the age, I’m 58 also.
I hunt in New Hampshire and Maine mostly, but this past year I spent a wonderful week hunting the Adirondack Park in upstate New York, excellent country, lots of woods and big deer. My buddy got a buck--I got skunked but had a great time.

Bob P.
Eileen says: The 'head's up' was reminding Bob he hadn't downloaded the November issue of RLN.
No need to answer, but I sure do enjoy John's articles.  With age I have developed the habit of
looking at the author of an article before reading it.  This often gives me a feel as to their level of
knowledge on the subject, plus whether the article will be written in an entertaining manner.  John
is number one on my list.  Boddington is my number two, and then there is a drop off, although there
are several knowledgeable guys writing occasionally in the VHA magazine.  Brian Pearce seems
to do a good job, but I am not a heavy-duty handgun fellow.  (A compliment for John sure got
long-winded.)

Alan W.
On Obsessions of a Rifle Loony
Just a note to thank you and John for my Christmas present.
My daughter, Jillian, ordered John's book for me, complete with autograph, after a not-so-subtle hint, and she was delighted with the service, and the personal note she got, as well.
The book is fantastic, and reads as well as my Jack O'Connor books, which is a Good Thing.  However, if John decides to change professions, he'd fit into the health care arena quite well.  The quality of his signature alone would get him into medical school.
Have a great week.
.

Mike H.
Put me on your email list for Rifle Loony  News.  The two of you make more sense writing than anyone else I've found to read. 
Chuck D.

How Do I Find You Each Month?

JOHN, I AM A GREAT ADMIRER OF YOUR MANY DIVERSE TALENTS AND ABILITIES IN THE OUTDOOR RIFLE AND SHOOTING SPORTS. I SUGGEST YOU CONSIDER WRITING ON SMALLBORE AND HI-POWER RIFLE SILHOUETTE. THESE ARE GREAT SHOOTING SPORTS ALMOST NEVER WRITTEN ABOUT.  IT IS THE ONLY SPORT THAT COMES CLOSE TO HELPING A GUY LEARN TO SHOOT WELL. YOU CAN BE A REAL COMPETITOR OR JUST A HO-BO LIKE ME WHO LOVES RIFLES.

I TRY TO GET MY GRUBBY HANDS ON EVERYTHING YOU WRITE, WHICH IS BECOMING INCREASING HARDER. IT WOULD BE GOOD TO KNOW EACH MONTH WHERE YOU HAVE AN ARTICLE OR ARE ON-LINE. ALSO MY WIFE AND I BOTH FAVOR YOUR WIFES WORKS. YOU TRULLY ARE A MODERN DAY KEN WATERS, JIM CASADA, JACK OCONNOR, JIM CARMICHAL, JAY LENO, ETC. THERE IS JUST NO-ONE IN YOUR LEAGUE AND THAT INCLUDES GUYS LIKE BODDINGTON- YOU SPEAK TOTHE REGULAR DEDICATED GUN GUY LIKE ME, ALL IN GOOD HUMOR. YOU HAVE MANY READERS HERE IN PA. PLEASE CONSIDER MY SUGGESTIONS. BEST REGARDS

Mel H
Eileen says: Check out the 'Where's John' section on our home page. We update that regularly.

Obsessions of a Rifle Loony

“Obsessions of a Rifle Loony” is probably a book for you if you can answer yes to any of these questions: Do you know what Jack O’Connor, Elmer Keith and Col. Townsend Whelen have in common without checking Google or Wikipedia?
Can you discuss the ballistic difference between a .300 magnum, .300 short magnum, and .300 ultra magnum?
Have you ever read a “Gun Digest” cover to cover?
Do you occasionally buy a new rifle when you have an existing rifle that does essentially the same thing?
Do you like entertaining stories about rifles that don’t include authoritative chest thumping?
If you’re still with me, John Barsness’ new book "Obsessions of a Rifle Loony" should be added to your reading list. It’s the collective wisdom of Barsness’ 50 years writing about guns. He’s spent enough time studying, shooting and hunting to know the hype from reality.
If you’ve read many gun magazines, you probably recognize his name. The book is a collection of his writing that’s broken into 31 chapters on rifles, shooting, hunting, and all things in between that rifle shooters tend to obsess about. It’s more like essays than how-to, but there’s plenty of that as well.
His book is self published, so it’s not filtered through an editor at a publishing house or a magazine editor nervous about offending potential advertisers. Barsness is free with his opinions (more than you can shake a stick at, he says) and seems to enjoy poking sarcastic fun at those who think newer is better, whether rifles or souped-up magnum cartridges. He also explodes many myths about rifle designs, ballistics and killing power.
But he’s not an egotist who writes from a pulpit, he’s more like a knowledgeable, good-natured buddy who shares his expertise from across a campfire.


Idaho Statesman review, Dec '10

John’s writing & Rifle Loony News

John is one of my favorite, if not my favorite contemporary, outdoor writers.  It is difficult to articulate what it is about his style of writing that I like other than it seems genuine.  And I agree with him most of the time which always helps in one's liking of a given writer!  I believe it is likely that he could write about topics that I have no interest in (e.g. professional sports), and I would still find his writing interesting and entertaining.  The appeal is not just the topic but also the presentation.  I’ve been reading his articles for more than ten years now.  After I read “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” for the third or so time, which was after I had been reading John’s articles for some time, I concluded with a high probability that Jack and Wylla Barsness are his parents.  That book being one of my top three all time favorite reads and a perceived certain similarity of building of logic and accessible writing style may account for some of the appeal of his writing.  John’s opinion usually comes across as having more than a little objective thought behind it.

I particularly liked the Back Burner piece John wrote in volume two, issue two titled “Long-Range Hunting”.  Now I will have to get a copy of “Meditations on Hunting” to read.  The comment on the purpose of prairie dog shooting was not lost on me.  I have read articles lamenting the loss of opportunities for prairie dog shooting due to over shooting; for which I believe the appropriate response would be “job well done!”  I think there is a crucial difference in mind set between hunting and pest eradication, and target practice with live animals.  Shooting can be an integral part of hunting or a complete process wholly outside of hunting and I guess hunters sometimes get confused on which is their primary objective in a given situation.  To me hunting like mountain climbing is best as a personal quest that may also be enjoyed with companions rather than a self or group competitive sport.  The enjoyment is in the process of the endeavor and the kill or summit is a personal validation of having partaken of the process.

The Back Burner pieces are what I look forward to and usually enjoy the most.

I look forward to many more issues to come.

 

 


Keith
John says, Yes, Jack and Wylla in Zen and the Art... are my parents.

On John’s writing and Obsessions of a Rifle Loony

I have enjoyed John's writing for several years as it is very easy / pleasant reading without seeming "dummed down" as much of what we read in today's periodicals is. I have found "Obsessions of a Rifle Loony" particularly savory, but enough sucking up...
I have one of the special run of Ruger 1H rifles in .25-06, as apparently John does. I have gotten into reloading - especially rifles - over the past several. (In fact this is probably one of the reasons I have taken more note of John's writing - though being 49 and into firearms since a kid, it seems as if I have been reading his writing throughout my adulthood.) I realize that every single rifle / barrel performs differently, but is there any particular article or book where John shares some his pet loads for this particular rifle? (Most especially 110-120 gr. loads - including primer choice. Yes, I did see his general tip in "Obsessions.") I would appreciate any guidance or information. Thanks for all of the good writing.


Richrd L.

Slice of the Wild and Obsessions of a Rifle Loony

Your cookbook and John's Rifle Loony book were big hits this Christmas. My brother sat down with John's book and didn't emerge until it was time to go see True Grit (my dad took my brothers in Oregon to see it on Christmas). My brother raved about how great John's book is and "look, it's even autographed!

I gave your cookbook to our Back Country Horsemen friends. Bob and LeAnn hunt with us, too, so I thought it might be appropriate. Bob is not much of a reader, but LeAnn said he has come home from work each of the last 3 nights and pulled out your cookbook, periodically reciting a tip or hint that you gave. Hopefully, they will invite us over to eat some of your recipes. Yep, I have your book, too, and cook from it often, but eating someone else's version is a lot more fun.   So, thanks a lot for your efforts. You and John made Steve and me look good this Christmas.

 


Lisa

On Slice of the Wild & Rifle Loony News

Eileen: You're right, [riflesandrecipes.com] works like a charm!  I got on and ordered John's latest book, and was able to access the newsletter as well.  I'm not normally computer illiterate, but in this case, got flummoxed.
Do you send notices for renewal  on the newsletter or how does that work?
As an aside, my son loves your kielbasa recipe.  He shot his first deer this year, and wanted the whole thing kielbasa...we compromised and made half Italian, half kielbasa, for variety and versatility.
Thanks, take care, and best to you and John in the New Year!


Scott
Eileen says "Yes, we send out renewal notices; and now, notices when the new RLN is posted.

Slice of the Wild & Obsessions of a Rifle Loony

Just a note of appreciation for your books. Last year I ordered Eileen's "Slice of the Wild" and have used several of the recipes - Boone Stew is a favorite. For Christmas I requested John's "Obsessions of a Rifle Loony" as a gift. Read it in a few days and have re-read parts of it more than once. (rifle bedding, 257, 270, - the 416 Rigby chapter was an especially enjoyable read about John's Texas buffalo hunt.) Thanks also to John on his common sense comments on on-line forums. Thanks again for your books.


Clint

Slice of the Wild

Thanks for shipping my second Slice of the Wild so promptly!  I gave my boyfriend his copy early so we could process my first deer (a tasty spike!) ourselves & we both just loved the book, so I had to order one for my brother!  Chris & I can't wait to try the recipes and we both love that you've included sides to go with the meals...
Thanks again!


Susan J.

Slice of the Wild and Heart Shots

Great book, Eileen! Slice, unlike most game cookery books, belongs on the shelf alongside our old, battered, and stained L.L.Bean Game and Fish Cookbook. It arrived yesterday, and I've only had time to scan it. Like the Bean book, though, it will provide reading beyond the obvious utilitarian. I think we'll learn a lot from it, and it will make an excellent gift for other hunters we know.

Beth is interested in Heart Shots. She apparently recognizes Hamerstrom's name from things she's used in her women's studies-type classes, and, of course, she hunts.

We'll be buying a copy soon.

Hope all is well with you and the Resident Rifle Loony.

 

 


Bill B.

Slice of the Wild>

Eileen--Received your book... great stuff. This is exactly the format I'd been kicking
> around (but will almost certainly never do) for a "cookbook" of my
> own... from the field to the table. Problem is, as you have recognized
> and addressed, some hunters are great at dealing with game in the
> field but can't boil water, while others are capable cooks who can't
> gut a deer. Your comprehensive approach is perfect and I will review
> the book myself for TBM.


Don Thomas, editor Traditional Bow Hunter magazine

Slice of the Wild

Eileen’s  book is fantastic--packed with incredibly valuable information and written in her lovely, breezy style. I sat down and read it cover to cover.

 


Tom Dickson, Editor Montana Outdoors mag
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>
Page 2 of 3